Story for the vision of resilience, 2016

contributing text

https://www.thenatureofcities.com/

《回復力に関する視線の物語》2016

寄稿文

https://www.thenatureofcities.com/

This is a story for a vision of resilience. This is not real; however, it is based on reality that is happening in parts of the world.

 

-Beginning of Story-

 

Mr. Smith is an average guy who works an 8-to-5 job. He is a creative director for virtual reality (VR) immersive environment. He commutes by subway and takes the same route to get to work every day. At 7 p.m., he meets up with his friends and grabs a beer. By 10 p.m., he gets home and watches a TV show. He happens to watch a travel and documentary channel about a small island with sociopolitical issues.

 

—Mr. Smith turns on TV.

The reporter, Napaj, describes the island from his previous knowledge and reports what he sees to his viewers and adds some of his thoughts.

The small island is a part of an archipelago and is famous for its active volcanoes and the related earthquakes, as well as tsunamis. It is his first visit to the island and he gives such information as context for his viewers. The island has beautiful mountains, forest, and sea and the people harvest fruit and vegetables and also catch fish and animals for everyday life.

 

Napaj drives a car and crosses a bridge to enter the island. As soon as he enters the island, he comes across a huge slogan saying “Empower and enrich our community by nuclear energy”. In the past, people on this island heavily depended on harvest by nature and developed a belief system worshipping the spirit of nature. He often stops by shrines and temples with beautiful representational ornaments. He continues driving the car and comes across another slogan saying, “Stop nuclear energy”. It seemed that the local residents must have put up such a slogan, but he doesn’t see anyone nearby.

He stops by a local restaurant for his lunch. He orders assorted slices of fresh fish. All the fishes are too rare and too expensive to have in major cities, and he shows off the variety of rare fishes and their freshness to the viewers. Even a local fisherman tells him that it is becoming more and more difficult to catch them, since the forest doesn’t hold raindrops in the soil because of the lumber industry and doesn’t drain good nutrients to the rivers and sea. And the local fishermen lose their jobs and become construction workers to make roads and public buildings by order from the local and the national governments.

 

After he finishes reporting his lunch, Napaj notices a TV in the restaurant showing footage of a big earthquake and the following tsunami, as well as the explosion of the nuclear plant. He recalls that it has been five years since the incident and nothing has been resolved. He thinks of his son and daughter. What kind of living conditions and natural environment can be passed down to them? He couldn’t think of a concrete solution for them, but was dared to challenge the issues with ideas and actions through his travels and findings.

 

He continues to drive his car to the west and comes across another slogan saying, “Abolish nuclear weapons! A town for peace”. He has gotten to know that there must have been several groups who have different values and perspectives for survival in the town. He looks for a local resident and finds a young woman with her daughter. Both are looking toward the sea.

The reporter (Napaj) : Hello. How are you? I am Napaj, a TV reporter from overseas. You don’t mind if I asked you a couple of questions?

 

A local woman: Hello, nice meeting you. Yes. I don’t mind. But I am not sure if I could correctly answer your question. Don’t you mind?

 

The reporter: Not at all. So, would you tell me a little bit about all those slogans about the nuclear plant and so on?

 

Local woman: Ah, yes. These were put in at different periods. The first one was put up about 30 years ago. People on this island didn’t have much benefit from economical development back then and also couldn’t continue farming and fishing for their livelihoods since the soil and water were affected by pollution from somewhere.  

 

The reporter: That’s really sad… So, the first slogan, “Empower and enrich our community by nuclear energy” was put up about 30 years ago.

 

Local woman: Yes. I was also as young as my daughter here—about five years old—back then. I thought it was natural to believe that it was good thing.

 

The reporter: Then, how about another one, “Stop nuclear energy”? 

 

Local woman: Ah, that was put up almost at the same time. I mean, local residents didn’t like the idea of putting dangerous energy nearby. But half the residents thought it was necessary for the people on this island to survive, since the national government and the electricity company agreed to give financial support to the local government… even for research…

 

The reporter: Research?

Local woman: Yes, money for research before actually beginning the construction. Tons of money was poured into this town… not sure who received the benefit… but this state of equilibrium continued over 30 years, until now.

 

The reporter: Also, the other slogan? “Abolish nuclear weapons! A town for peace”?

 

 Local woman: Yeah. It was put up some time in the past. Do you remember? This country is the only country that has suffered from nuclear bombs? But people never thought that nuclear energy was as dangerous as the nuclear bomb… such a pity, don’t you think?

 

 The reporter: I see. I see the whole story behind them now. I feel very sorry but I am glad that the landscape and the beautiful oceans remain well. Wasn’t it a good thing for you?

 

Local woman: I think so. I would think so. I just can’t say yes or no… to be honest. Can you see the rock formation at the tip of the pier?

The reporter: Ah, yes, I can see rocks piling up on top of each other and I can also see something man-made on it, but it looks collapsed… What is it?

 

Local woman: It is a gate made of stone. I am glad that you are from other part of the world. We believe that it is a secret gate to communicate with spirit of nature. You know, I am a bit scared when I see it collapsed… Have you heard of Shinto?

 

The reporter: I have heard of it but I don’t know what it is. 

 

Local woman: Don’t worry. It is a bit too complicated to explain anyway. But don’t feel bad about it. Even we don’t know what it is exactly. 

 

The reporter: O.K. I will study it later. And I really appreciate your time and your kindness.

 

Local woman: You are very welcome. Thank you very much for coming to this small island. I wish you continue a good travel and experience here. I want you to come back again, though!

 

The reporter: Yes, definitely. By the way, where else should I visit before going home?

 

 Local woman: Maybe a hot spring? You know, this island is famous for its hot springs, I mean, famous for its volcanic activity, more precisely. Didn’t you pass by a hot spring public bath just right after crossing the bridge?

 

 The reporter: A hot spring public bath? Do you recommend it?

 

Local woman: Yes, of course. It is our culture! It is also brand new. But only concern that you may have is… that this public bath was built by financial support from the national government and the electricity company,, though the hot spring water is great and refreshing. Please try it, if you have some time.

 

The reporter: Thank you very much for the info. Yeah, it means something… I will keep it in my mind.

 

—The TV program ends, and Mr. Smith turns off the TV.

Mr. Smith thought the TV program was very intriguing and thought provoking, in a way. He couldn’t easily say that it was good or bad … rather, he thought that people were living under such uncertainty, under a double-edged sword. At the same time, he was fascinated by the beautiful nature in the small island through the broadcasting and kept thinking about how he can adapt such beautiful footage into his VR immersive environment project, so that his customers can enjoy such beautiful scenes at home, even in cities, without visiting actual places…

When the TV program ended, it was almost midnight. He was ready for bed and he left the room. As he is about to leave the room, an emergency alert beeps out of his cell phone. And the display shows: “Emergency alert, Earthquake in Otomamuk.” 30 seconds later, his rooms shook and an electricity bill slipped off from piles of receipts that he collected to pay for his living next month.

 

-End of the Story-

In this story, there are so many ways to read and interpret, which I intended for my readers to do in order to evoke their own thoughts. I assume that lots of people may get confused about the situation. What I wanted to speak about is perspective shift and interdependency. I am not intending to express opposition to economical and technological development, but rather use of it and the related decision-making it prompts. This relates to ethical and philosophical ideas and values as a backbone for our survival.

 

Technological advancement has dramatically changed our lives and environment. When I saw an actual case about the repurposing of a research budget from a nuclear plant project to a hot spring facility in an actual town in Japan, I was so impressed and thought it is about resilience of the local citizens. This type of decision was made upon democratic agreements between individuals, corporations, and government. I have never seen such shift of decision. So, what I would like to say my vision of resilience is this type of shift, perspective change.

 

In Japan, we experience lots of devastating natural disasters and most of the time we can’t change, but must accept, the situation. We learn from our experience, success, and failure. So, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, tremendously impacted our perspectives towards nuclear energy and nuclear power plants more than the Great Hanshin Earthquake in 1995, especially because of the nuclear plant explosion and after effects, which are considered to have been triggered by decision-makers’ misleading.

I am wondering how much technological advancement changes our perspective towards mobility and experiences. In the story above, my illustration about a creative director for VR immersive environment was my implication about perspective shift.

 

Do we still need to travel to a place when we can virtually visit and experience through actual footage? In a way, this might be an effective solution to reduce human impact on nature, environment, and the earth, which I can also think of as a vision for resilience. However, in reality, we are more and more eager to travel and to physically experience such places.

 

Then, I ask myself about how we can reach ideal lives and maintain sound conditions for us to survive and to be content, as well as being sound for the whole ecosystem … We are all inseparable and interdependent.

 

P.S. Currently, we are experiencing another big earthquake in Kumamoto, which occurred on April 14, 2016.

In the story, there is a name called “Otomamuk”, which refers to the current earthquake in Kumamoto, Japan.

これは回復力に関する視線の物語です。これは本当のことではありませんが、この世界の裏側で起こっている現実です。

-​物語の始まり-

 

スミス氏は朝8時から5時という定時の仕事についている平均的な男性です。彼は仮想現実環境の仕事をするクリエイティブ・ディレクターです。地下鉄で通勤し、毎日同じルートを通って仕事に行きます。夜の7時には友人と会ってビールを飲みます。夜の10時には帰宅し、テレビを観ます。たまたま彼は社会政治問題を抱える小さな島についての旅行とドキュメンタリーの番組をいることになります。

 

---スミス氏はテレビをつけます 。

 

ナパージというレポーターが事前知識をもとにその島について説明し、彼の見るものを視聴者にレポートし、感想を付け加えます。

この小さな島は群島の一部で活火山や地震で有名で、かつ津波でも有名です。今回は彼の初めての訪問でかれは視聴者にそのような情報を文脈として提供します。この島は美しい山、森、海があり、その住民は果物や野菜を収穫し、魚や動物を日々の生活のために捕獲します。

 

彼は車を運転しこの島へ入るために橋を渡ります。この島に入るとすぐに、彼は大きなスローガンに出くわします 。「原子力による地域活性化」。過去にこの島の人々は大いに自然の恵みを拠り所にし、自然崇拝の信仰形態を発展させました。彼は時折、美しい象徴的な装飾のある神社やお寺を訪ねます。車を運転し続け、もう一つのスローガンに出くわしました。「原子力阻止」。地元の人々がそのようなスローガンを設置したのでしょうが近くには誰も見当たりませんでした。

 

彼は昼ごはんのために地域の食堂を訪れます。新鮮な刺身の盛り合わせを注文します。魚は全部とても貴重な種類で主要都市では高くて手に入りません。そして、彼は視聴者にこれらの貴重な魚やその新鮮さを見せびらかします。地元の人は漁がますます難しくなっていることや林業が原因で森が土壌に水を蓄えないために、品質の良い栄養が川や海に流れないとからとさえ語ります。そして、地元の漁師さんは職を失い、地方行政や国の命令で道路や公共施設の建設のための工事作業員になっています。

 

彼が昼ごはんのレポートが終わると、テレビで大きな地震やそれを追ってやってきた津波、原子力発電所の爆発の映像が流れているのに気がつきます。あの出来事が起きてから5年経つことを思い起こしますが何も解決していません。彼は息子や娘のことを考えます。どのような生活状況や自然環境を彼らに渡すことができるだろうか?彼らのために具体的な解決策を考えることができず、かれはアイデアや旅や発見を通しての行動でその問題にしっかりと挑戦してきました。

彼は西の方へと車の運転を続け、もう一つのスローガンに出くわします。「核爆弾廃止!平和な町」。彼はこの町には生活のために異なった価値観や視線をもった幾つかのグループがいるはずだと確信しました。彼は地元の人を探し、娘と一緒にいる若い女性を見つけます。二人とも海の方を見ています。

 

レポーター(ナパージ):どうもこんにちは。私はナパージです。海外のテレビレポーターです。いくつか質問してもよろしいですか?

 

地元の女性:こんにちは。初めまして。はい、かまいませんよ。でも、質問に正しく答えられるかわかりません。大丈夫ですか?

 

レポーター:全くかまいません。では、原子力発電所などに関するこれらのスローガンについて少しお話しください。

 

地元の女性:あ〜、そうですね。あのスローガンはいろんな時期に設置されたんですよ。最初のは30年前。その当時の経済発展の恩恵をこの島の人々は全く受けなかったんですよ。それにどこからかきた環境汚染によって土壌や水が悪影響を受けたので、農作業や漁が続けられなかったんです。

 

レポーター:それは本当に悲しいですね...そうですか、最初のスローガンである「原子力による地域活性化」は約30年前に設置されたんですね。

 

地元の女性:そうですね。私もここにいる娘ぐらいの年齢でそのころは5歳ぐらいだったです。それをいいことだと真実ことはとても自然なことだと思っていました。

 

レポーター:それでは、「原子力阻止」の方はどうですか?

地元の女性:あ〜、あれもほぼ同じ時期に設置されました。地元住民は危険なエネルギーを近所に設置するアイデアを好んでいなかったんですよ。でも、住民の半分はこの島で生活していくのに必要だと思っていたんですよ。国や電力会社が地元行政に経済支援をする約束をしたので...しかも、リサーチのための経済支援でさえも

 

レポーター:リサーチ?

 

地元の女性:そうなんです。実際に建造が始まる前のリサーチのための資金です。多額の資金がこの町に注がれました...誰がその恩恵を受けているかは定かではありませんが...でも、この均衡状態が今まで30年以上も続いています。

 

レポーター:では、最後のスローガンは?「核爆弾廃止!平和な町」は?

 

地元の女性:はい。いつかはわかりませんが設置されました。覚えていますか?この国は核爆弾で唯一、苦しんだ国なんですよ。でも、人々は原子力発電が核爆弾と同じくらい危険だとは全然考えていませんでした...残念なことですよね?

 

レポーター:そうですね。スローガンの背景の全体のストーリーが分かりました。とても残念ですが風景や美しい海が残っているのは嬉しいです。良いことだとは思わないですか?

 

地元の女性:そうですね。そう思います。イエスかノーでは答えられないです...正直なところ。港の先にある岩の群れが見えますか?

 

レポーター:あ〜、はい、岩が重なり合っているのが見えますね。人工的に出来たなにかも見えますが壊れていませんか...なんですかあれは?

 

地元の女性:あれは石で作られた門です。あなたが世界の反対側から来てくれて嬉しいですね。私たちはあれを自然の精霊と意思疎通を図るための秘密の門だと信じているんです。お分かりですね。あれが壊れていたのを見たとき少し怖くなりました...神道について聞いたことはありますか?

レポーター:聞いたことはありますがどんなことかは知りません。

 

地元の女性:心配しないでください。説明するには少し複雑なんですよ。悪く思わないでくださいね。私たちもよく理解していないんですよ。

 

レポーター:O.K.後で勉強しますね。本当にご親切にお時間をくださりありがとうございました。

 

地元の女性:どういたしまして。この小さな島に来てくださって本当にありがとう。ここでの良い旅と体験を続けてください。また、来てくださいね!

 

レポーター:はい、絶対に。ところで帰る前にどこを訪ねるべきですかね?

 

地元の女性:それなら、温泉は?この島は温泉で有名なんです。つまり、正確には活火山で。橋を渡ってすぐのところの温泉公衆浴場を通りませんでしたか?

 

レポーター:温泉公衆浴場?お勧めしますか?

 

地元の女性:はい、もちろん。私たちの文化ですから。新しいですし。ただ、懸念があるとしたら...この公衆浴場は国と電力会社からの経済支援で建設されました。とはいえ、温泉は素晴らしいですし気持ちいいですよ。もし時間があるのであれば、試してみては?

 

レポーター:情報をくださりありがとうございました。そうですね。何かあるかもしれませんね...気に留めておきます。

 

---テレビ番組が終わり、スミス氏はテレビを消します。

 

スミス氏はこのテレビ番組がとても興味をそそり、ある意味、示唆に富んだものだと思いました。良いとか悪いとかすぐに言えませんでした...むしろ、人々は不確かさやもろ刃の剣のもとに生活をしているのだと思いました。同時に、放送を通してこの小さな島の美しい自然に魅了され、また、どのようにその美しい風景映像を彼の仮想現実没入型プロジェクトに応用できるかを考え続けていました。そうすれば、彼の顧客は実際にその場を訪れることなく都市にいながら家庭でそのような美しい場面を楽しむことができると...そのテレビ番組が終わると、すでに深夜近くでした。就寝しようと部屋を去りました。彼がその部屋をまさに出ようとする時、彼の携帯電話から緊急速報の警報が鳴り響きました。携帯の画面には「緊急速報、オトマムックで地震」とあります。30秒後、彼の部屋が揺れ、翌月の生活費の支払いように集めておいたレシートの山から電気代の請求書がひらりと落ちました。

 

-物語のおしまい-

 

 

この物語には、たくさんの読み方や解釈の仕方があります。読者自身の考えを誘発するために意図的に行いました。多くの人がこの状況に困惑するかもしれません。私が伝えたいことは、意識の移行と相互依存についてです。経済的かつ技術的な発展に反対を表明するつもりはないですが、それの使い方や関連する決定方法については反対意見があります。これは私たちが生き延びるための要として倫理的かつ哲学的なアイデアであり価値観に関係しています。

 

技術革新は劇的に私たちの生活や環境を変化させました。日本の実際の町で原子力発電所の研究費が温泉施設建設へ転化された実際の事例を見て、とても印象深く感じ、地物市民による回復力だと思いました。この種の決断は個人、企業、政府の間で民主主義的な合意のもとになされます。私はそのような決断の移行は見たことがありませんでした。それで、回復力に関する視線について伝えたいことはこの種の移行、視線の変化です。

 

日本で、私たちは壊滅的な自然災害を経験し、多くの場合、私たちはその状況を変えることはできず受け入れるのみです。私たちは成功や失敗という経験から学びます。そして、2011年3月11日の東北地震と津波は、1995年の阪神大震災の時よりも一層、原子力発電に対する私たちの視線に多大な衝撃を与えました。特に原子力発電所の爆発とその後の影響のためです。その影響は意思決定者の誤った判断によって誘発されたとも考えられました。

 

私は技術革新が機動力や体験にどれほど変化をもたらしたか不思議に思います。上記の物語で、仮想現実没入環境のクリエイティヴ・ディレクターについての描写は視線の移行についての示唆となっていました。仮想的に訪れたり、実際の映像を通して経験できる場へ私たちは旅する必要があるでしょうか?ある意味で、これは自然や環境、また地球に対する人類のインパクトを減少させる効果的な解決策かもしれません。これ自体が回復力に関する視線について思うところです。しかし、実際には、私たちはますます現実で物理的に旅し、体験することに熱狂的になっています。そして、私は理想的な生活に到達することや存続のためや充実し健全な状況を維持する方法とはどのようなものかを自答します。また、生態系全体にとっての健全なこととはどのようなものか...私たちは不可分で相互依存しています...

 

追伸、2016年4月14日に起きた熊本での大きな地震を経験しています。この物語に出てくる「オトマムック(Otomamuk)」は熊本で起きた地震を指し示しています。

 © 2018 by Keijiro Suzuki

  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • グレーのYouTubeアイコン
  • Grey Vimeo Icon
Keijiro
Suzuki